LECKWITH BRIDGE TO BE CLOSED NEXT WEEK FOR MAJOR REPAIRS

Leckwith Bridge - which will be closed to traffic next week.

Leckwith Bridge – which will be closed to traffic next week.

Leckwith Bridge - a view most motorists never see

Leckwith Bridge – a view most motorists never see

Leckwith Bridge which connects the B 4267 with the major junction with Hadfield Road, and the A4232  is to be closed from Monday to Friday (inclusive) next week.

The bridge will be closed from midnight on Sunday night February 23rd to midnight on Friday February 28th.   Pedestrian access will be maintained at all times.

Signed diversions for traffic will be in place via Hadfield Road, Penarth Road, Barry Road, Penlan Road and the remaining open section of Leckwith Road.

The road surface has deteriorated so badly it will have to be dug-out  to a depth of 16 inches

The road surface has deteriorated so badly it will have to be dug-out to a depth of 16 inches

Leckwith Bridge, which was originally built in 1935, is said to be in a “poor condition” and already has a weight restriction imposed on it. To avoid overloading the 80-year-old structure the road crews will be using smaller and lighter vehicles than usual.

Engineers say the road surface is rapidly deteriorating and last summer’s hot weather further weakened the surface when high temperatures brought the tarmac almost to melting point. The surface has been so badly weakened a 16-inch depth of road way is to be dug out and replaced.

Leckwith Bridge was opened in 1935 by the then Minister of Transport, Leslie Hore-Belisha – who also introduced the orange “Belisha Beacons” on zebra crossings, the 30 mph speed limit in towns and the Driving Test.

The viaduct section of Leckwith Bridge

The 500 foot viaduct section of Leckwith Bridge was a considered a major piece of highways engineering in 1934

The single-track 16th century Ely Bridge still copes with heavy lorries

The old  single-track stone-built 16th century bridge alongside Leckwith Bridge still copes with  heavy loads

The bridge  crosses the River Ely but the road continues to be carried South West  on a 500 foot pre-stressed concrete viaduct towards Leckwith Hill.  In its day this was considered a major piece of highways engineering .

Leckwith Bridge was built alongside the original old single-track sixteenth-century stone bridge which spans the Ely on three arches and is still in use by heavy lorries accessing local builders’ yards.

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6 Responses to LECKWITH BRIDGE TO BE CLOSED NEXT WEEK FOR MAJOR REPAIRS

  1. Martin Coffee says:

    Wow! The Vale have announced this before the event. They have got something right for a change. I bet they wont be starting work at 0001 after the 0000 hours closure on Monday morning though.

    The e fag shop, oops, sorry, Post Office, could learn a leason or two from The Vale. Good grief. I never thought that I’d compliment The Vale.

    • newsnetuk says:

      Actually Martin, as of 7.45 this morning Thursday February 20th, the Vale has not yet put a press release about the bridge-closure on its website.

      • Martin Coffee says:

        Sorry. I withdraw my compliments to The Vale though I do compliment the PDN for bringing this to our attention in spite of The Vale.

        Obviously there are others in The Vale who could do with training and exams.

  2. Tim Hughes says:

    Prestressing of concrete is a complex procedure that requires the steel bars to be tensioned under quite high loads whilst the concrete sets and. It started in the UK after WW2, due to the shortage of steel, so Leckwith Bridge is certainly made of reinforced concrete but probably not prestressed. In the concrete bridge world the nearby Cogan Viaduct is really quite interesting as strain gauges were installed during its construction to try to measure how long the concrete continues to “creep” (shrink) and the gauges which are inside the twin boxes were accessed and read for 20 years after it was built. Just some info!!

    • newsnetuk says:

      Tim: This sounds very authoritative. We’ll leave the error in the story so that your interesting background explanation can still be read here

  3. nathan lloyd says:

    there was road signs up for over a week telling you about it being closed.

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