CIVIC SOCIETY TO RAISE FUNDS TO REPLACE PENARTH’S AXED TREES

Work underway to remove - branch by branch - a dead horse-chestnut tree in Paget Place Penarth. This has been a textbook example of how the agreement between Penarth Civic Society and the Vale of Glamorgan Council should work

Work underway to remove – branch by branch – a dead horse-chestnut tree in Paget Place Penarth. This has turned out to be a textbook example of how the recent  agreement between Penarth Civic Society and the Vale of Glamorgan Council should work in practice.

Penarth Civic Society is developing a “long-term strategy” to fund the replacement of pavement or highway trees in the town which are felled.

James Long RIBA - chairman of the Penarth Civic Society

James Long RIBA – chairman of the Penarth Civic Society

The Civic Society chairman Mr James Long says the funds raised will provide for the  “replacement of felled trees  in an adjacent location, restore original tree avenues, enhance the exiting town tree canopy and plant trees in streets where there are none.”

The issue of the progressive loss of Penarth’s distinctive highway trees has arisen again following the felling this week –  by contractors working for the Vale of Glamorgan Council  – of a large horse-chestnut tree in Paget Place Penarth.

This particular felling however has provoked no public reaction because, in this case,  the removal of the tree was fully justified and it was carried out – to the letter – following the procedure now agreed between the Vale Council and Civic Society.

  • The tree was diseased and had not produced new  growth or leaf properly for several years.
  • Vale of Glamorgan Council staff met the secretary of the Civic Society’s  ‘Tree Forum’ and Mr Long its chairman on site to inspect the tree.
  • The Society was briefed on the  condition of the tree, and “after careful consideration decided not to contest the proposed felling”.
  • The council posted public notices on the tree explaining why it was to be taken down.

The sequence of events appears to demonstrate that – not withstanding some hiccups in the past – the procedure agreed by the Vale Council and the Civic Society is now working as it should.

The dead horse-chestnut had begun to rot and had to be removed

The dead horse-chestnut had begun to rot and had to be removed

The Vale Council says the horse-chestnut had been monitored by the council for three years and was found to be “totally dead” and the base had started to rot.    The tree had been suffering from a disease called “bleeding canker” which there is no way to stop once it takes hold .

A number of other horse-chestnuts  in Penarth are also said to be suffering from the same disease  and the council proposes that any replacement should be a “sweet chestnut” tree – a species less susceptible to the disease.

 

About NewsNet

Penarth Daily News email address dmj@newsnet.uk . Penarth Daily News is an independent free on-line fair and balanced news service published by NewsNet Ltd covering the town of Penarth in the Vale of Glamorgan, Wales, UK. All our news items are based on the information we receive or discover at the time of publication and are published on the basis that they are accurate to the best of our knowledge and belief at that time. Comments posted on the site by commentators reflect their opinions and are not necessarily shared, endorsed or supported by Penarth Daily News.
This entry was posted in Penarth Daily News. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to CIVIC SOCIETY TO RAISE FUNDS TO REPLACE PENARTH’S AXED TREES

  1. Max Wallis says:

    Penarth Civic Society is NOT, as your headline says, raising funds to replace felled street trees. The Committee agreed to make an application last year for a grant to plant one tree and associated street changes in a key location. That application was unsuccessful. The Vale council has policy, funds and technical capacity to replace each tree felled with another.

  2. Mark says:

    I thought Chris “fusion” Loyn was president of Penarth Civic Society?

  3. Max Wallis says:

    James Long is elected chairman, as stated. Loyn’s position is as nominated President; he doesn’t see any conflict with his business as designer of modern ‘brutalist’ architecture, as in the proposed Northcliffe Lodge flats development. He didn’t as President influence the Penarth Society committee’s strong opposition to this application.

Comments are closed.